Mango Sentinel

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Posts tagged success

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The myth of the overnight success is just that – a myth.

Seth Godin

Alexander Graham Bell knew this when he famously said, “It is the man who carefully advances step by step, with his mind becoming wider and wider … who is bound to succeed in the greatest degree.”

Thomas Edison knew this when he proclaimed, “Success is the product of the severest kind of mental and physical application.”

Amelia E. Barr knew this when she asserted, “Everything good needs time.”

(via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

Filed under seth godin marketing startups Alexander Graham Bell Thomas Edison Amelia E. Barr quotes success

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There are some things success is not: it’s not fame, it’s not money or power, success is waking up in the morning so excited about what you have to do, that you literally fly out the door, its getting to work with people you love, success is connecting with the world, and making people feel, it’s finding a way to bind together people who have nothing in common but a dream, it’s falling asleep at night knowing you did the best job you could, success is joy, and freedom, and friendship … and success is love.
-Fame

Filed under fame movie quotes success love

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“Success isn’t just about what you accomplish in your life, it’s about what you inspire others to do and when you do accomplish something as simple as quitting smoking or losing weight, you’ll inspire others to do the same. Anyone can change the world, and everybody should try. And it all starts with your own life.”

“Success isn’t just about what you accomplish in your life, it’s about what you inspire others to do and when you do accomplish something as simple as quitting smoking or losing weight, you’ll inspire others to do the same. Anyone can change the world, and everybody should try. And it all starts with your own life.”

(Source: workisnotajob, via inspired-by-chaos)

Filed under inspire success service to others

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"Success is not a matter of spontaneous combustion. You must set yourself on fire.” -Fred Shero

People all too often wait for success to happen to them. “If only it would fall into place…”, “Surely someone will discover who I am and what I can do soon…” or “Just a little while longer and it’ll all come good…” are examples of the things we say while we’re waiting for success to come along.
 Of course, the big thing I’ve come to learn is that it doesn’t work that way. Finding success – real success – isn’t a passive thing. It’s not something that happens to you like watching a movie or getting your hair cut. Finding success is something that happens in you.
 Here are 4 things for you to think about:
1. What does success look like to you?
What comprises success? How much of it is material? How much of it is emotional? How much of it is spiritual? Get specific about what success does and doesn’t mean to you.
2. Imagine yourself towards the end of your life
Picture yourself towards the end of your life as happy and content as you can be. What is it about that future you that tells you as clear as day that they’re happy and content? Picture yourself walking up to them and asking them what it is that allowed them to reach that point. What single piece of advice can they give you?
3. How focused are you on working on your success?
What are you willing to do to get the kind of success you want?  What are you waiting for the world to deliver to you so that you can have that success?
4. Are you driving your success?
How would it be if you were driving that success rather than waiting for it?  What changes do you notice in how you do things and how you feel about things?
I’m not suggesting for one minute that you can’t ask others, the world, the universe or whatever higher power you happen to believe in for help.  I’m not even suggesting that you become wholly focused on working towards your success. That’s missing the point.
The point is that we humans tend to be focused on working towards happiness and success and assume that until it comes along we have to spend time being unhappy, suffering or struggling.
———-
The truth is that things happen much easier and more readily if we don’t struggle, suffer or assume unhappiness: The assumption that you need to struggle or fight for your success is a false one. Real success comes much easier and becomes more consistent when you operate straight from that place of success instead of assuming it’s out there in the world somewhere.
Go after what’s important to you and get going on all those shiny things you’d love to have, do and be in life, but recognize how much more pleasureable it’s going to be when you’re feeling happy and successful rather than unhappy and unsuccessful.
Fred got it right. Don’t wait for spontaneous combustion or for someone to set light to you. Dive into your own happiness and success, engage with those things and operate from a place where they’re real and present.
Don’t wait, set your soul on fire.

kudos to lifehack

"Success is not a matter of spontaneous combustionYou must set yourself on fire.” -Fred Shero

People all too often wait for success to happen to them. “If only it would fall into place…”, “Surely someone will discover who I am and what I can do soon…” or “Just a little while longer and it’ll all come good…” are examples of the things we say while we’re waiting for success to come along.

 Of course, the big thing I’ve come to learn is that it doesn’t work that way. Finding success – real success – isn’t a passive thing. It’s not something that happens to you like watching a movie or getting your hair cut. Finding success is something that happens in you.

 Here are 4 things for you to think about:

1. What does success look like to you?

What comprises success? How much of it is material? How much of it is emotional? How much of it is spiritual? Get specific about what success does and doesn’t mean to you.

2. Imagine yourself towards the end of your life

Picture yourself towards the end of your life as happy and content as you can be. What is it about that future you that tells you as clear as day that they’re happy and content? Picture yourself walking up to them and asking them what it is that allowed them to reach that point. What single piece of advice can they give you?

3. How focused are you on working on your success?

What are you willing to do to get the kind of success you want?  What are you waiting for the world to deliver to you so that you can have that success?

4. Are you driving your success?

How would it be if you were driving that success rather than waiting for it?  What changes do you notice in how you do things and how you feel about things?

I’m not suggesting for one minute that you can’t ask others, the world, the universe or whatever higher power you happen to believe in for help.  I’m not even suggesting that you become wholly focused on working towards your success. That’s missing the point.

The point is that we humans tend to be focused on working towards happiness and success and assume that until it comes along we have to spend time being unhappy, suffering or struggling.

———-

The truth is that things happen much easier and more readily if we don’t struggle, suffer or assume unhappiness: The assumption that you need to struggle or fight for your success is a false one. Real success comes much easier and becomes more consistent when you operate straight from that place of success instead of assuming it’s out there in the world somewhere.

Go after what’s important to you and get going on all those shiny things you’d love to have, do and be in life, but recognize how much more pleasureable it’s going to be when you’re feeling happy and successful rather than unhappy and unsuccessful.

Fred got it right. Don’t wait for spontaneous combustion or for someone to set light to you. Dive into your own happiness and success, engage with those things and operate from a place where they’re real and present.

Don’t wait, set your soul on fire.


kudos to lifehack

Filed under inspire let your soul on fire success drive your future

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Steve Jobs & the 7 Rules of SuccessSteve Jobs’ impact on your life cannot be underestimated. His innovations have likely touched nearly every aspect—computers, movies, music and mobile. As a communications coach, Carmine Gallo learned from Jobs that a presentation can, indeed, inspire. For entrepreneurs, Jobs’ greatest legacy is the set of principles that drove his success. Here’s Carmine Gallo’s (a student of Jobs life of sorts) take on the rules and values underpinning his success. Any of us can adopt them to unleash our “inner Steve Jobs.”1 Do what you love. Jobs once said, “People with passion can change the world for the better.” Asked about the advice he would offer would-be entrepreneurs, he said, “I’d get a job as a busboy or something until I figured out what I was really passionate about.” That’s how much it meant to him. Passion is everything.2 Put a dent in the universe. Jobs believed in the power of vision. He once asked then-Pepsi President, John Sculley, “Do you want to spend your life selling sugar water or do you want to change the world?” Don’t lose sight of the big vision.3 Make connections. Jobs once said creativity is connecting things. He meant that people with a broad set of life experiences can often see things that others miss. He took calligraphy classes that didn’t have any practical use in his life — until he built the Macintosh. Jobs traveled to India and Asia. He studied design and hospitality. Don’t live in a bubble. Connect ideas from different fields.4 Say no to 1,000 things. Jobs was as proud of what Apple chose not to do as he was of what Apple did. When he returned in Apple in 1997, he took a company with 350 products and reduced them to 10 products in a two-year period. Why? So he could put the “A-Team” on each product. What are you saying “no” to? 5 Create insanely different experiences. Jobs also sought innovation in the customer-service experience. When he first came up with the concept for the Apple Stores, he said they would be different because instead of just moving boxes, the stores would enrich lives. Everything about the experience you have when you walk into an Apple store is intended to enrich your life and to create an emotional connection between you and the Apple brand. What are you doing to enrich the lives of your customers?6 Master the message. You can have the greatest idea in the world, but if you can’t communicate your ideas, it doesn’t matter. Jobs was the world’s greatest corporate storyteller. Instead of simply delivering a presentation like most people do, he informed, he educated, he inspired and he entertained, all in one presentation.7 Sell dreams, not products. Jobs captured our imagination because he really understood his customer. He knew that tablets would not capture our imaginations if they were too complicated. The result? One button on the front of an iPad. It’s so simple, a 2-year-old can use it. Your customers don’t care about your product. They care about themselves, their hopes, their ambitions. Jobs taught us that if you help your customers reach their dreams, you’ll win them over.There’s one story that I think sums up Jobs’ career at Apple. An executive who had the job of reinventing the Disney Store once called up Jobs and asked for advice. His counsel? Dreambigger. I think that’s the best advice he could leave us with. Bottom-line: See genius in your craziness, believe in yourself, believe in your vision, and be constantly prepared to defend those ideas.

Steve Jobs & the 7 Rules of Success

Steve Jobs’ impact on your life cannot be underestimated. His innovations have likely touched nearly every aspect—computers, movies, music and mobile. As a communications coach, Carmine Gallo learned from Jobs that a presentation can, indeed, inspire. For entrepreneurs, Jobs’ greatest legacy is the set of principles that drove his success. Here’s Carmine Gallo’s (a student of Jobs life of sorts) take on the rules and values underpinning his success. Any of us can adopt them to unleash our “inner Steve Jobs.”

1 Do what you love. Jobs once said, “People with passion can change the world for the better.” Asked about the advice he would offer would-be entrepreneurs, he said, “I’d get a job as a busboy or something until I figured out what I was really passionate about.” That’s how much it meant to him. Passion is everything.

2 Put a dent in the universe. Jobs believed in the power of vision. He once asked then-Pepsi President, John Sculley, “Do you want to spend your life selling sugar water or do you want to change the world?” Don’t lose sight of the big vision.

3 Make connections. Jobs once said creativity is connecting things. He meant that people with a broad set of life experiences can often see things that others miss. He took calligraphy classes that didn’t have any practical use in his life — until he built the Macintosh. Jobs traveled to India and Asia. He studied design and hospitality. Don’t live in a bubble. Connect ideas from different fields.

4 Say no to 1,000 things. Jobs was as proud of what Apple chose not to do as he was of what Apple did. When he returned in Apple in 1997, he took a company with 350 products and reduced them to 10 products in a two-year period. Why? So he could put the “A-Team” on each product. What are you saying “no” to? 

5 Create insanely different experiences. Jobs also sought innovation in the customer-service experience. When he first came up with the concept for the Apple Stores, he said they would be different because instead of just moving boxes, the stores would enrich lives. Everything about the experience you have when you walk into an Apple store is intended to enrich your life and to create an emotional connection between you and the Apple brand. What are you doing to enrich the lives of your customers?

6 Master the message. You can have the greatest idea in the world, but if you can’t communicate your ideas, it doesn’t matter. Jobs was the world’s greatest corporate storyteller. Instead of simply delivering a presentation like most people do, he informed, he educated, he inspired and he entertained, all in one presentation.

7 Sell dreams, not products. Jobs captured our imagination because he really understood his customer. He knew that tablets would not capture our imaginations if they were too complicated. The result? One button on the front of an iPad. It’s so simple, a 2-year-old can use it. Your customers don’t care about your product. They care about themselves, their hopes, their ambitions. Jobs taught us that if you help your customers reach their dreams, you’ll win them over.

There’s one story that I think sums up Jobs’ career at Apple. An executive who had the job of reinventing the Disney Store once called up Jobs and asked for advice. His counsel? Dreambigger. I think that’s the best advice he could leave us with. 

Bottom-line: See genius in your craziness, believe in yourself, believe in your vision, and be constantly prepared to defend those ideas.

Filed under steve jobs success Apple must keep going